The Stillness

By: Fran Davis-Harris
July 01, 2015

What would it look like if your gap was filled with intentional stillness—stillness that points us toward purpose, wholeness and healing?

As we were sitting at the table having deep, meaningful conversation about our lives and the various stages of our journey, one of my colleagues made a statement that shook me to my core. “What are you afraid of in the stillness?”

Psalm 46:10 instructs us to be still and know. This passage of scripture leads me to believe that answers are found in the stillness— answers that point us in many different directions. Some of those directions are in un-charted territory. Here is where the fear factor is introduced. Here is where I want to say, “I am only responsible for what I know therefore I don’t want to know.”

The answers found in the stillness bring about the responsibility of accountability to what you heard while you were still.

Have you tried being still? Have you tried to detach, even for a few moments, from the busy-ness of your life? Busy-ness that is not necessarily always purpose driven but sometimes a welcomed distraction. Busy-ness that is the space between what is and what is to be. Parker Palmer, co-founder of the Center for Courage and Renewal, refers to this as the “tragic gap”. What would it look like if your gap was filled with intentional stillness—stillness that points toward purpose, wholeness and healing?

Isn’t it interesting that we find ourselves running from that thing that will benefit us most because we don’t want the responsibility of accountability to the truth?

Since this conversation I have found myself being still on purpose to find purpose. It has not been easy because some of the truth that comes in the stillness is painful and some of the direction that comes in the stillness is daunting. I never thought I would welcome pain and daunting tasks but I find myself in a space where these two things are pushing me to the other side of my “tragic gap” into what is to be. Kind of makes the gap not so tragic after all.

Tags: Thinking Out Loud


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